How Do Pharmaceutical Drugs Get in Drinking Water? The Answer is Here

How do pharmaceutical drugs get in drinking water? Did this question cross your mind after the recent release of an AP investigative report on the subject?

Before the story, I never thought about what was in the water that I was drinking. I felt safe. The only time I ever worried about the water that I drinking was when we had a severe storm and a boil water order was issued.

But, after seeing that headline flash on the TV screen, I knew I needed to know more. Just like you I asked myself the question, “How do pharmaceutical drugs get in drinking water?”

Then I thought about it for a minute. I thought about all the places that drugs are found starting with the labs that create the drugs. From there, the pharmaceuticals reach hospitals, clinics, doctors’ offices, pharmacies, patients, veterinarians, farmers and the list goes on. I thought about how they get from one place to another. They are transported by boat, plane, car, truck, and mail carrier. And finally I thought about the billions of people who use pharmaceuticals everyday. It didn’t take me very long to realize the answer to my question, “How do pharmaceutical drugs get in drinking water?” The answer is a simple one. We put them there.

Drug recalls, expired drugs, defective drugs all have to go somewhere. They end up in landfills or flushed down the drain. We do it in our homes. If we have expired or left over medicine, what do we do with it? We put it in the trash; rinse it down the drain or flush it down the toilet. No matter which method is chosen the drugs eventually end up in the water It really is a wonder that we don’t read more articles with the headline: probe finds drugs in drinking water.

But, answering the question, “How do pharmaceutical drugs get in drinking water?” wasn’t enough for me. I wanted to know how I could protect my family.

I ran out and bought a case of bottled water But, then I discovered that the water that I had bought was tap water in a bottle. In fact, I discovered that most bottled water is tap water This definitely wasn’t the right choice.

I didn’t want to have to worry ever again if I read: “Probe Finds Drugs in Drinking Water” in my local newspaper. So I checked out getting a water filtration system for my home.

There were a lot of different water filtration methods available. I found distillers, reverse osmosis systems, carbon-ion systems etc.; but which one was right for me?

I checked them out and discovered that the carbon-ion filtration method did the best job when it comes to making sure that the drugs found in our drinking water will not reach my children’s lips.

The carbon-ion filtration method is twofold. First the thick carbon block filters the water so any bacteria, chemical, or other sediment is trapped. The ion exchange acts to render the drugs and other chemicals found in water inert.

I found out through my research that I don’t really need to know the answer to the question: “how do pharmaceutical drugs get in drinking water?”. Or have to worry about headlines that read; “probe finds drugs in drinking water ” I just have to sit back and let my carbon-ion filtration work for me.

For more information on the importance of water filters, visit Water Is Health.

The Real Reason Pharmaceutical Drugs Get in Drinking Water?

You’ve read the stories about medical waste like syringes washing up on the shores of public beaches. While this is alarming enough, now a similar threat is turning up in our water supplies. Drugs are being found in water supplies across the country. But how do pharmaceutical drugs get in drinking water?

Initially, individuals take drugs in a pill or other format. While the human body absorbs most of the medication, a good portion of the drug is eliminated as body waste and is flushed into the sewer system. Next, this wastewater is treated before it is released into reservoirs, rivers or lakes. After that, some of the water is treated at drinking water treatment facilities and then routed to public water supplies. But what happens is that only a large amount of the treatment plants do not effectively remove all drug particles.

You might have seen the recent headline: AP probe finds drugs in drinking water? Such media attention literally rocked the government and environmental community. It all started when the Associate Press began a five-month investigation to learn what’s in our drinking water. The agency found that drugs have been detected in the drinking water supplies of 24 major metropolitan areas like New York City, Philadelphia and Detroit; to name a few.

So what are the risks from having these medications in our water? While researchers do not yet understand the exact risks from decades of slow exposure to different combinations of pharmaceuticals, recent studies have found disturbing effects on human cells and animals.

We already asked the question how do pharmaceutical drugs get in drinking water?  So how do we get them out? One technology is called reverse osmosis. It removes virtually all pharmaceutical contaminants. However, it is highly expensive when used on a big scale. Plus, it also leaves several gallons of polluted water for every one that is made clean. And finally, this process strips water of really essential minerals that our body’s need.

Other treatment processes add chorine to water to get rid of the drugs. But that method has its drawbacks too. There’s proof that adding chlorine to water makes some pharmaceuticals more toxic. Some drugs, including widely used cholesterol fighters, tranquilizers and anti-epileptic medications, resist modern drinking water and wastewater treatment processes. Plus, the EPA says there are no sewage treatment systems specifically set up to remove pharmaceuticals.

With the lack of resources available to filter the drugs out of water, how harmful is it? So much is still unknown. Many independent scientists are skeptical that trace concentrations of drugs will prove harmful to humans. Such reasoning has been established because the studies conducted poisoned the lab animals with much higher doses of the drugs.

When a probe finds drugs in drinking water, it causes experts to look deeper into the long-term effects on people. For example, there’s the issue abut how the drugs and the combinations of drugs can harm humans over decades because water, unlike most specific foods, is consumed in large amounts on a daily basis.

This recent topic as of late is “how do pharmaceutical drugs get in drinking water?” but for many decades, federal environmental officials and non-profit watchdog groups were focused on how contaminants in water. Such substances as pesticides, lead, PCBs were the big concerns of the past.

Today, the scientific community is worried about the long-term implications of this problem. The fact of the matter is that our bodies can resist a relatively big dose of medication in one shot. But our systems can suffer from smaller doses ingested continuously over periodic use. This can slowly mess with our allergies or cause nerve damage. What’s more, women who are expecting, senior citizens and those who are weak and very ill might be much more sensitive.

If you walk away with only one thing from reading this, be safer with what your drink. Look into a home water purification device or contact your local water authority to see where you stand in this mess. In fact, some of the experts feel that medications may pose a unique danger because, unlike most pollutants, because they were designed to specifically affect the human body.

Just How Do Pharmaceutical Drugs Get in Drinking Water?

If you’ve read the news recently, you’ve probably heard that small amounts of pharmaceutical drugs have been found in drinking water. You’re probably asking yourself, “How do pharmaceutical drugs get in drinking water?” There are a couple of ways that drugs get in our drinking water and unless we as a nation stop taking pharmaceutical drugs altogether, there is little that can be done to prevent it.

A probe finds drugs in drinking water and the general public panics. Most of you may have not heard about this problem until now. Did you know that our government and water providers have known about this for a long time but have kept it a secret from the general public because they did not believe that we knew how to interpret the information correctly?

None of us, not even the scientific community, knows the exact risks posed by long-term exposure to small amounts of medications. What we do know however, is that extended exposure to small amounts of drugs can negatively affect human cells and wildlife. So how do pharmaceutical drugs get in drinking water?

As a probe finds drugs in drinking water, many people have questions and want answers. Most prescription drug traces get in drinking water because when people take drugs their bodies do not absorb it all and whatever doesn’t get absorbed is eliminated. Whatever gets eliminated is then flushed down the toilet and heads to the water treatment plant. Water treatment facilities are not equipped to remove prescription drug traces from the water so the “treated” water is released back into the water supply.

How do pharmaceutical drugs get in drinking water in other ways? Most commonly, people flush unneeded or expired drugs down the toilet in individual homes and in nursing homes and hospitals. These drug traces may not show obvious side effects but scientists worry that lifetime exposure can cause irreversible damage.

So what can we do to protect ourselves? As a probe finds drugs in drinking water, our government is finally starting to take action. However, since our government is currently still lagging behind in regulating the amount of drugs found in drinking water, presently our only option is to invest in a home water filtration system. Carbon block and carbon granular filters are the most effective at removing all contaminants, including prescription drugs.

So the next time someone asks you, “How do pharmaceutical drugs get in drinking water?” you will be equipped to answer them and tell them about carbon block and carbon granular filtration. If your health and that of your friends and family concerns you, spread the word so we can all have access to healthy, clean water.